Detroit Red Wings' Darren Helm still in his prime years

The Escalating Trend of Paying for Prime Years

A Year and Change

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  • There are 124.5 million Americans in their prime working years (ages 25-54). Nearly one-quarter of this group — 28.9 million people, or 23.2 percent of the total — is not currently employed. They either became so discouraged that they left the labor force entirely, or they are in the labor force but unemployed. This group of non-employed individuals is more than 3.5 million larger than before the recession began in 2007.

    Did you know that when you take the number of working age Americans that are officially unemployed () and add that number to the number of working age Americans that are considered to be “not in the labor force” (), that gives us a grand total of 102.5 million working age Americans that do not have a job right now? I have written about this , but today I want to focus just on Americans that are in their prime working years. When you look at only Americans that are from age 25 to age 54, 23.2 percent of them are unemployed right now. The following analysis and chart …

  • Among those unemployed, the GOP Budget Committee members report, 10 million U.S. men in their prime working years “are simply not working.”

    “There are 124.5 million Americans in their prime working years (ages 25–54). Nearly one-quarter of this group—28.9 million people, or 23.2 percent of the total—is not currently employed. They either became so discouraged that they left the labor force entirely, or they are in the labor force but unemployed.

  • According to the chart, 28.9 million Americans who are in their prime working years are now absent from the labor market, compared to 95.6 million 25- to 54-year-olds who are currently employed.

BBC - Future - What’s the prime of your life?

“There are 124.5 million Americans in their prime working years (ages 25–54). Nearly one-quarter of this group—28.9 million people, or 23.2 percent of the total—is not currently employed. They either became so discouraged that they left the labor force entirely, or they are in the labor force but unemployed.This group of non-employed individuals is more than 3.5 million larger than before the recession began in 2007,” writes the Republican side of the Senate Budget Committee.